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Annotated Bibliography on the Philosophical Work of Eriugena (Second Part: K - Z)

BIBLIOGRAPHY

The publications by É. Jeauneau on Eriugena are cited in a separate page: Édouard Jeauneau sur la Philosophie Médiévale. Bibliographie Choisie.

N.B. Summaries cited from: Mary Brennan, A Guide to Eriugenian Studies. A Survey of Publications 1930-1987, are indicated with: (B.) and page number.

  1. Kabaj, Józef. 1977. "Homme Et Nature Dans La Cosmologie De Jean Scot Erigena." Studia Mediewistyczne no. 18:3-50.

    "This article begins by tracing the history of the term phusis/natura from the earliest Greek philosophers onwards. The author finds the sources of Eriugena's four divisions in Augustine, Origen and Philo of Alexandria (p. 8) as also in Marius Victorinus. Another (tripartite) variation is to be found in Claudianus Mamertus or in Boethius. The author then analyses (pp. 12 ff.) Eriugena's synthesis of patristic and platonic views while finding Aristotelian elements within his exposition. At the outset this author has declared for a Marxist interpretation of Eriugena and much of section (3) Nature as seen by Eriugen is concerned with a review of mainly 20th century scholars' judgments of his work as either dualist i.e. orthodox in christian terms, or monist/pantheist i.e. unorthodox, which would be this author's own view: thus the major themes of the Periphyseon are discussed, his dialectic leading, inevitably, to monism and pantheistic emanationism. Two sections (4 and 5) 'Human nature in Eriugena' and 'Man and his Existence' treat of man as microcosm, again going back to Heraclitus to trace the reception of this theory: according to Eriugena man participates in both the second and third divisions of nature. The supposed ontological dualism of Eriugena is in fact pancosmic spiritualist monism. In section (6) 'Man's cosmic consciousness' the factor of 'vital motion' is discussed. The author holds (p. 38) that Eriugena needed a fifth 'complementary' book for his Periphyseon because the first four did not suffice to resolve the theory of his four divisions. In a final section (7) entitled 'Dialectic of human knowledge' the problem of man's ignorance of quid sit and of the relation between gnoseology and ontology are discussed; self-knowledge (quia sit) is existence." (B. pp. 232-233)

  2. Katz, Sheri. 1990. "Two Views on John Scottus Eriugena's Use of Aristotelian Categories." Medieval Perspectives no. 4-5:97-110.

  3. Kavanagh, Catherine. 2002. "The Philosophical Importance of Grammar for Eriugena." In History and Eschatology in John Scottus Eriugena and His Time, edited by McEvoy, James and Dunne, Michael, 61-76. Leuven: Leuven University Press.

  4. ———. 2003. "Eriugenian Developments of Ciceronian Topical Theory." In Medieval and Renaissance Humanism. Rhetoric, Representation and Reform, edited by Gersh, Stephen and Roest, Bert, 1-30. Leiden: Brill.

  5. ———. 2005. "The Influence of Maximus the Confessor on Eriugena's Treatment of Aristotle's Categories." American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly no. 79:567-596.

    "The Aristotelian categories are a fundamental element in Eriugena's philosophical system on account of his realist view of dialectic. He received his texts concerning the categories from Boethius and the De decem categoriis, but key ideas in his treatment of them -- namely, the metaphysical importance of dialectic, the unknowability of essence, and the origin of being in place and time, ideas fundamentally rooted in Byzantine developments of the Christology of Chalcedon -- are taken from Maximus the Confessor. Eriugena's work on the categories represents an attempt, much misunderstood, to assimilate the richness of the Eastern tradition to Western philosophical and theological method. This paper examines the synthesis of Maximus's ideas with Ciceronian and Boethian elements in Eriugena's striking treatment of the Aristotelian Categories."

  6. ———. 2009. "John Scottus Eriugena and the Uses of Dialectic " In The Irish Contribution to European Scholastic Thought, edited by McEvoy, James and Dunne, Michael, 21-36. Dublin: Four Courts Press.

  7. Kendig, Elizabeth. 2013. "La Forme Dialogique Dans Le Periphyseon: Recréer L’esprit." Les Études philosophiques:101-119.

    "The form of the dialogue, in this case the interchange between the Nutritor and the Alumnus, is the most obvious feature of Eriugena’s Periphyseon, but it is curiously taken for granted in most discussions of the work. This essay observes the nature and function of the two personae of the dialogue, and the relationship between them, with the suggestion that the dialogue of the Periphyseon might actually be a bifurcated interior monologue. Examination of internal evidence from Books IV and V illustrates the ways that the Alumnus functions as a rhetorical vehicle that provides the impetus for the upward spiral of the discussion. In addition to serving as a model of the ideal intended audience of the Periphyseon, the character of the Alumnus provides an opportunity for the Nutritor, ostensibly the superior voice in the dialectic, to develop his arguments and fully convince himself, thus bringing the discussion to a higher level. In the process, the characters of the Alumnus and the Nutritor together become an embodied example of one of the key points of Eriugena’s idealist philosophy: in a dialogue between participants, when one understands what the other understands, he is indescribably created in the other, and they are made one understanding."

  8. Kijewska, Agnieszka. 2011. "The Conception of the First Cause in Book Two of John Scottus Eriugena's Periphyseon." Anuario filosófico no. 44:29-52.

  9. Kijewska, Agnieszka, Majeran, Roman, and Schwaetzer, Harald, eds. 2011. Eriugena - Cusanus, Colloquia Mediaevalia Lublinensia, 1. Lublin: Wydawnictwo KUL.

  10. Kristeller, Paul Oskar. 1976. "The Historical Position of Johannes Scottus Eriugena." In Latin Script and Letters A.D. 400-900. Festschrift Presented to Ludwig Bieler on the Occasion of His 70th Birthday, edited by O'Meara, John Joseph and Naumann, Bernd, 156-164. Leiden: Brill.

  11. Labowsky, Lotte. 1943. "A New Version of Scotus Eriugena's Commentary on Martianus Capella." Mediaeval and Renaissance Studies no. 1:187-193.

  12. Laga, Carl. 1996. "A Complete Graeco-Latin Index of Maximus Confessor's Quaestiones Ad Thalassam." In Iohannes Scottus Eriugena. The Bible and Hermeneutics, edited by Riel, Gerd van, Steel, Carlos and McEvoy, James, 169-182. Leuven: Leuven University Press.

  13. Le Bourdellés, R. 1977. "Connaissance Du Grec Et Méthodes De Traduction Dans Le Monde Carolingien Jusqu'à Scot Erigène." In Jean Scot Erigène Et L'histoire De La Philosophie, edited by Roques, René. Paris: Éditions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique.

  14. Leonardi, Claudio. 1977. "Glosse Eriugeniane a Marziano Capella in Un Codice Leidense." In Jean Scot Erigène Et L'histoire De La Philosophie, edited by Roques, René, 171-182. Paris: Éditions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique.

  15. ———. 1986. "Martianus Capella Et Jean Scot: Nouvelle Présentation D'un Vieux Problème." In Jean Scot Écrivain, edited by Allard, Guy-H., 187-207. Paris: Vrin.

  16. Liebeschütz, Hans. 1960. "Zur Geschichte Der Erklärung Des Martianus Capella Bei Eriugena." Philologus.Zeitschrift für die Klassische Altertum no. 104:127-137.

  17. ———. 1973. "The Place of Martianus Glossae in the Development of Eriugena's Thought." In The Mind of Eriugena, edited by O'Meara, John Joseph and Bieler, Ludwig, 49-58. Dublin: Irish University Press.

  18. Lo Presti, Maria Gabriella. 1990. "La Dialettica Come "Diffiniendi Disciplina" Nel I Libro Del De Divisione Naturae Di Giovanni Scoto Eriugena." In Knowledge and the Sciences in Medieval Philosophy. Proceedings of the Eighth International Congress of Medieval Philosophy (S.I.E.P.M.) Helsinki 24-29 August 1987, edited by Knuuttila, Simo, Asztalos, Monika, Tyorinoja, Reijno and Ebbesen, Sten, 558-564. Helsinki.

    Voume II.

  19. Lucentini, Paolo. 1976. "La Nuova Edizione Del Periphyseon Dell'eriugena." Studi Medievali no. 17:393-414.

    "The 'new' edition referred to is the Sheldon-Williams edition of Books I and II for the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies. This author reports on the manuscript tradition established in the early decades of this century through the studies of Traube, Rand and Cappuyns and offers some critical suggestions in relation to the completion of the Sheldon-Williams edition interrupted by his death in October 1973. He refers to some inexactitudes in the references to sources, in the description of manuscripts in the Introduction to the edition, as well as in the conclusions on the question of text transmission and of the Eriugenian autograph (which continues to be an open question). He finds that the editor does not succeed in his goal of presenting Eriugena's final text." (B., p. 92).

  20. ———. 1977. "La "Clavis Physicae" Di Honorius Augustodunensis E La Tradizione Eriugeniana Nel Secolo Xii." In Jean Scot Erigène Et L'histoire De La Philosophie, edited by Roques, René. Paris: Éditions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique.

  21. ———. 1979. "Le Thème De L'homme-Microcosme Dans La Patristique Grecque Et Chez Jean Scot Érigène." Diotima no. 7:111-115.

  22. ———. 1980. Platonismo Medievale. Contributi Per La Storia Dell'erigensimo. Firenze: La Nuova Italia.

  23. Luhtala, Anneli. 1993. "Syntax and Dialectic in Carolingian Commentaries on Priscian's Institutiones Grammaticae." Historiographia Linguistica no. 20:145-191.

    This number of the review was also published in volume: Vivien Law (ed.), History of Linguistic Thought in the early Middle Ages, Amsterdam, J. Benjamins, 1993.

  24. ———. 1996. "Grammar and Dialectic: A Topical Issue in the Ninth Century." In Iohannes Scottus Eriugena. The Bible and Hermeneutics, edited by Riel, Gerd van, Steel, Carlos and McEvoy, James, 279-301. Leuven: Leuven University Press.

  25. ———. 2000. "Glosses Based on Eriugena's Priscian Commentary." Miscellanea Bibliothecae Apostolicae Vaticanae no. 7:199-213.

  26. ———. 2002. "Time and the Substantival Verb in Eriugena." In History and Eschatology in John Scottus Eriugena and His Time, edited by McEvoy, James and Dunne, Michael, 77-87. Leuven: Leuven University Press.

  27. ———. 2003. "A Priscian Commentary Attributed to Eriugena." In History of Linguistics 1999. Selected Papers Frm the Eighth International Conference on the History of the Language Science, 14-19 September 1999, Fontenay-St. Cloud, edited by Auroux, Sylvain, 19-30. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

  28. ———. 2012. "Eriugena's Commentary on Priscian's Definitions of the Noun and the Verb." In Arts Du Langage Et Théologie Aux Confins Des Xie/Xiie Siécles. Texts, Maîtres, Débats, edited by Rosier, Irène, 583-601. Turnhout: Brepols.

  29. Madec, Goulven. 1977. "L'augustinisme De Jean Scot Dans Le "De Praedestinatione"." In Jean Scot Erigène Et L'histoire De La Philosophie, edited by Roques, René, 183-190. Paris: Éditions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique.

  30. ———. 1980. "Observations Sur Le Dossier Augustinien Du "Periphyseon"." In Eriugena. Studien Zu Seinen Quellen, edited by Beierwaltes, Werner, 75-84. Heidelberg: Carl Winter.

  31. ———. 1983. "Le Dossier Augustinien Du Periphyseon De Jean Scot (Livres Iii-V)." Recherches Augustiniennes no. 18:183-223.

  32. ———. 1986. "Jean Scot Et Ses Auteurs." In Jean Scot Écrivain, edited by Allard, Guy-H., 143-186. Paris: Vrin.

  33. ———. 1988. Jean Scot Et Ses Auteurs. Annotations Érigéniennes. Paris: Études augustiniennes.

    Reprint of five already published studies.

  34. ———. 1991. "Theologia: Note Augustino-Érigénienne." In From Augustine to Eriugena. Essays on Neoplatonism and Christianity in Honor of John O'meara, edited by Martin, Francis X. and Richmond, John A., 117-125. Washington: Catholic University of America Press.

  35. Mainoldi, Ernesto Sergio. 2004. "Le Fonti Del De Praedestinatione Liber Di Giovanni Scoto Eriugena." Studi Medievali no. 45:651-697.

  36. ———. 2005. "Iohannes Scottus Eriugena." In La Trasmissione Dei Testi Latini Del Medioevo / Mediaeval Latin Texts and Their Transmission, edited by Chiesa, Paolo and Castaldi, Lucia, 186-264. Firenze: SISMEL - Edizioni del Galluzzo.

  37. Marenbon, John. 1980. "John Scottus and the Categoriae Decem." In Eriugena: Studien Zu Seinen Quellen, edited by Beierwaltes, Werner, 116-134. Heidelberg: Carl Winter.

    Reprinted as Essay V in: John Marenbon, Aristotelian Logic, Platonism, and the Context of Early Medieval Philosophy in the West, Aldershot, Ashgate, 2000.

  38. ———. 1980. "A Florilegium from the Periphyseon." Recherches de Théologie Ancienne et Médiévale no. 47:271-277.

  39. ———. 1981. From the School of Alcuin to the School of Auxerre. Logic, Theology and Philosophy in the Early Middle Ages. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    "The author of this study devotes two chapters (pp. 67-115) to Eriugena and his circle. An important underlying topic is the Categoriae decem and especially its treatment in Perphyseon Book I. The controversy on the world-soul involving Ratramnus of Corbie a decade earlier had touched on the question of the Universals. The opponent of Ratramnus, the pupil of the Irish teacher Macarius, had supported a view subsequently espoused by Eriugena (pp. 67-70). The author (Chapter 4) examines Eriugena's account of the categories first in Book I and what he calls its ramifications (p. 82) in the later books, giving special attention to Essence, and discerns an inconsistency in his metaphysical system. Chapter 5 devotes a section (pp. 89-96) to the status quaestionis of the scribal hands referred to as i1and i2 which occur in various manuscripts connected with the Eriugenian circle.

    In section II the investigation of manuscripts is extended to suggest the existence of a veritable writing circle, glossing and revising under the eye of the master: named manuscripts are discussed as reflecting various stages of revision or, in some cases, gratuitous unauthorised glossing sometimes from Eriugena's own later writings -- the wider 'circle' encompassing also Laon, Auxerre and Corbie for some decades at the end of the ninth and beginning of the tenth century. The variety of Eriugena's readership may be inferred from the range and content of the codices.

    In section III the author addresses the question of Eriugena's links with his contemporaries, in turn raising doubt of any connection with Sedulius (as suggested by MS Bern 363), suggesting that Laon 444 implies some influence on Martinus Scottus, confirming from the Periphyseon itself and from Wulfad's library list the collaboration of Wulfad at S. Médard of Soissons, where Heiric of Auxerre is likely to have come under his influence." (B. p. 51)

  40. ———. 1981. "Wulfad, Charles the Bald and John Scottus Eriugena." In Charles the Bald: Court and Kingdom. Papers Based on a Colloquium Held in London in April 1979, edited by Gibson, Margaret T. and Nelson, Janet Laughland, 375-383. Oxford: British Archaeological Reports.

    Reprinted as Essay VI in: John Marenbon, Aristotelian Logic, Platonism, and the Context of Early Medieval Philosophy in the West, Aldershot, Ashgate, 2000.

  41. ———. 1982. "Review Of: I.P. Sheldon-Williams (Ed.) Iohannis Scotti Eriugenae Periphyseon Iii." Journal of Theological Studies no. 32:601-608.

  42. ———. 1983. Early Medieval Philosophy (480-1150). An Introduction. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.

    See in particular Chapters 6 and 7 (pp. 53-78).

  43. ———. 1990. "John Scottus and Carolingian Theology: From the De Praedestinatione, Its Background and Its Critics, to the Periphyseon." In Charles the Bald: Court and Kingdom, edited by Gibson, Margaret T. and Nelson, Janet Laughland, 303-325. Aldershot: Variorum.

    Second revised edition of the volume published in 1981.

    Reprinted as Essay VII in: John Marenbon, Aristotelian Logic, Platonism, and the Context of Early Medieval Philosophy in the West, Aldershot, Ashgate, 2000.

  44. ———. 1993. "Carolingian Thought." In Carolingian Culture: Emulation and Innovation, edited by McKitterick, Rosamond, 171-192. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Reprinted as Essay III in: John Marenbon, Aristotelian Logic, Platonism, and the Context of Early Medieval Philosophy in the West, Aldershot, Ashgate, 2000.

  45. ———. 2000. Aristotelian Logic, Platonism, and the Context of Early Medieval Philosophy in the West. Aldershot: Ashgate.

    Essays related to Eriugena: III. Carolingian Thought; IV. Alcuin, the Council of Frankfort and the Beginnings of Medieval Philosophy; V. John Scottus and the Categoriae Decem; VI. Wulfad, Charles the Bald and John Scottus Eriugena; VII. John Scottus and Carolingian Theology: From the De Praedestinatione, its Background and its Critics, to the Periphyseon.

  46. ———. 2005. "Les Catégories Au Début Du Moyen Âge." In Les Catégories Et Leur Histoire, edited by Bruun, Otto and Corti, Lorenzo, 223-244. Paris: Vrin.

  47. ———. 2012. "Alcuin, the Council of Frankfort and the Beginnings of Medieval Philosophy." In Das Frankfurter Konzil Von 794. Kristallisationspunkt Karolingischer Kultur, edited by Rainer, Berndt, 603-615. Mainz: Selbstverlag der Gesellschaft für Mittelrheinische Kirchengeschichte.

    Reprinted as Essay IV in: John Marenbon, Aristotelian Logic, Platonism, and the Context of Early Medieval Philosophy in the West, Aldershot, Ashgate, 2000.

  48. Marler, Jack C. 1994. "Dialectical Use of Authority in the Periphyseon." In Eriugena East and West, edited by McGinn, Bernard and Otten, Willemien, 95-114. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press.

  49. ———. 2004. "Ammonius and Eriugena: On Matter and Predication." In Erkenntnis Und Wissenschaft. Probleme Der Epistemologie in Der Philosophie Des Mittelalters = Knowledge and Science. Problems of Epistemology in Medieval Philosophy, edited by Lutz-Bachmann, Matthias, Fidora, Alexander and Antolic, Pia. Berlin: Akademie Verlag.

  50. Martello, Concetto. 1984. "Sul Platonismo Di Giovanni Scoto. Tendenze Storiografiche Negli Studi Sulle Fonti Eriugeniane." In Momenti E Problemi Di Storia Del Platonismo, 85-107. Catania: CUECM.

  51. ———. 1986. Simbolismo E Neoplatonismo in Giovanni Scoto Eriugena. Catania: CUECM.

  52. ———. 1990. Analogia E Fisica in Giovanni Scoto. Catania: CUECM.

  53. ———. 2002. "Alle Origini Del Lessico Filosofico Latino. Hypostasis/Substantia in Giovanni Scoto." In Hyparxis E Hypostasis Nel Neoplatonismo, edited by Romano, Francesco and Taormina, Daniela Patrizia, 169-184. Firenze: Leo S. Olschki Editore.

    Atti del I Colloquio Internazionale del Centro di Ricerca sul neoplatonismo (Catania, 1-3 Ottobre 1992).

  54. ———. 2002. "Riflessi Del Parmenide in Giovanni Eriugena." In Il Parmenide Di Platone E La Sua Tradizione. Atti Del Terzo Colloquio Internazionale Del Centro Di Ricerca Sul Neoplatonismo, edited by Barbanti, Maria and Romano, Francesco, 371-393. Catania: CUECM.

  55. Mathon, Gérard. 1955. "Le Commentaire Du Pseudo-Érigène Sur La Consolatio Philosophiae De Boèce." Recherches de Théologie Ancienne et Médiévale no. 22:213-257.

    "De l'étude des sources de ce commentaire édité par M. Silk il ressort que la plus grande partie du texte des gloses est reprise littéralement au commentaire de Remi d'Auxerre ; quelques passages méritent cependant de retenir l'attention."

  56. ———. 1960. "Jean Scot Érigène, Chalcidius Et Le Problème De L'âme Universelle." In L'homme Et Son Destin D'après Les Penseurs Du Moyen Âge. Actes Du Premier Congrès International De Philosophie Médiévale, Louvain-Bruxelles, 28 Août-4 Septembre 1958, 361-375. Louvain: Nauwelaerts.

  57. ———. 1964. L'anthropologie Chrétienne En Occident De Saint Augustin À Jean Scot Érigène. Recherches Sur Le Sort Des Thèses De L'anthropologie Augustinienne Durant Le Haut Moyen Âge, Lille.

    Unpublished Ph.D. thesis Université Catholique de Lille, Faculté de théologie.

    Three volumes: I. L'héritage et sa transmission; II. Terminos Patrum ne transgrediaris; III. Références e notes annexes.

  58. ———. 1969. "Les Formes Et La Signification De La Pédagogie Des Arts Libéraux Au Milieu Du Ixe Siècle Dans L'enseignement Palatin De Jean Scot Erigène." In Arts Liberaux Et Philosophie Au Moyen Age. Actes Du Ive Congrès International De Philosophie Médiévale, Montréal, 27/8 - 2/9 1967, 47-64. Paris: Vrin.

  59. McEvoy, James. 1990. "Metaphors of Light and Metaphysics of Light in Eriugena." In Begriff Und Metapher. Sprachform Des Denkens Bei Eriugena, edited by Beierwaltes, Werner, 149-167. Heidelberg: Carl Winter.

  60. ———. 1992. "Neoplatonism and Christianity: Influence, Syncretism or Discernment?" In The Relationship between Neoplatonism and Christianity, edited by Finan, Thomas and Twomey, Vincent, 155-170. Dublin: Four Court Press.

  61. ———. 1994. "Biblical and Platonic Measure in John Scottus Eriugena." In Eriugena East and West, edited by McGinn, Bernard and Otten, Willemien, 153-178. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press.

  62. ———. 1999. "Thomas Gallus, Abbas Vercellensis, and the Commentary on the De Mystica Theologia Ascribed to Iohannes Scottus Eriugena, with a Concluding Note on the Second Latin Reception of the Pseudo-Dionysius (1230-1250)." In Traditions of Platonism. Essays in Honour of John Dillon, edited by Cleary, John J., 389-406. Aldershot: Ashgate.

  63. McGinn, Bernard. 1977. "The Negative Element in the Anthropology of John the Scot." In Jean Scot Erigène Et L'histoire De La Philosophie, edited by Roques, René, 315-326. Paris: Éditions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique.

  64. ———. 1995. "The Entry of Dialectical Mysticism." In The Growth of Mysticism. Vol. Ii. The Presence of God: A History of Western Christian Mysticism, 80-118. London: SCM Press.

    Part I: Early Medieval Mysticism. Chapter 3.

  65. McKitterick, Rosamond. 1992. "Knowledge of Plato's 'Tmaeus' in the Ninth Century. The Implications of Valenciennes, Bibliothèque Municipale Ms 293." In From Athens to Chartres. Neoplatonism and Medieval Thought. Studies in Honour of Edouard Jeauneau, edited by Westra, Haijo Jan, 85-95. Leiden: Brill.

  66. Meyendorff, John. 1994. "Remarks on Eastern Patristic Thought in John Scottus Eriugena." In Eriugena East and West, edited by McGinn, Bernard and Otten, Willemien, 51-68. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press.

  67. Meyvaert, Paul. 1973. "Eriugena's Translation of the Ad Thalassum of Maximus: Preliminaries to an Edition of This Work." In The Mind of Eriugena, edited by O'Meara, John Joseph and Bieler, Ludwig, 79-87. Dublin: Irish University Press.

  68. Michalowska, Monika. 2011. "The Concept of Language in Eriugena’s Thought." In Eriugena - Cusanus, edited by Kijewska, Agnieszka, Majeran, Roman and Schwaetzer, Harald, 17-30. Lublin: Wydawnictwo KUL.

  69. Mooney, Hilary A. 2009. Theophany. The Appearing of God According to the Writings of Johannes Scottus Eriugena. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck.

  70. Moran, Dermot. 1979. ""Natura Quadriformata" and the Beginnings of "Physiologia" in the Philosophy of Johannes Scottus Eriugena." Bulletin de Philosophie Médiévale no. 21:41-46.

  71. ———. 1989. The Philosophy of John Scottus Eriugena. A Study of Idealism in the Middle Ages. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

  72. ———. 1990. "Pantheism in Eriugena and Nicholas of Cusa." American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly no. 64:131-152.

  73. ———. 1992. "Time, Space and Matter in the Periphyseon. An Examination of Eriugena's Understanding of the Physical World." In At the Heart of the Real. Philosophical Essays in Honour of the Most Reverend Desmond Connell, Archbishop of Dublin, edited by O'Rourke, Fran, 67-96. Dublin: Irish Academic Press.

  74. ———. 1992. "Origen and Eriugena. Aspects of Christian Gnosis." In The Relationship between Neoplatonism and Christianity, edited by Finan, Thomas and Twomey, Vincent, 27-53. Dublin: Four Court Press.

  75. ———. 1996. "Eriugena's Theory of Language in the Periphyseon: Explorations in the Neoplatonic Tradition." In Ireland and Europe in the Early Middle Ages. Iv. Learning and Literature, edited by Richter, Michael and Ní Chatháin, Proinseas, 238-258. Stuttgart: Klett-Cotta.

  76. ———. 1999. "Idealism in Medieval Philosophy: The Case of Johannes Scottus Eriugena." Medieval Philosophy and Theology no. 8:53-82.

    "In this article I wish to re-examine the vexed issue of the possibility of idealism in ancient and medieval philosophy with particular reference to the case of Johannes Scottus Eriugena (c. 800-c. 877), the Irish Neoplatonic Christian philosopher. Both Bernard Williams and Myles Burnyeat have argued that idealism never emerged (and for Burnyeat, could not have emerged) as a genuine philosophical position in antiquity, a claim that has had wide currency in recent years, and now constitutes something of an orthodoxy. (1) Richard Sorabji (instancing Gregory of Nyssa) and Werner Beierwaltes (citing Proclus and Eriugena), and Eyjólfur Kjalar Emilsson (discussing Plotinus), on the other hand, have all argued that idealism is to be found in the Neoplatonic tradition, a tradition neglected by Burnyeat. (2) Similarly, in a 1989 study, I argued not only that idealism was a genuine possibility in late classical and in medieval philosophy, but that that the ninth-century Carolingian philosopher Johannes Eriugena presents a striking example of an extremely radical, almost fantastical, idealism. (3) Of course, the whole discussion depends entirely on what is meant by 'idealism'. Burnyeat uses Berkeley's immaterialism as his standard for idealism, and it is this decision, coupled with his failure to acknowledge the legacy of German idealism, which prevents him from seeing the classical and medieval roots of idealism more broadly understood."

    (1) Myles Burnyeat, "Idealism and Greek Philosophy: What Descartes Saw and Berkeley Missed," Philosophical Review 91 (1982): 3-40, reprinted in Godfrey Vesey, ed., Idealism -- Past and Present (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982), pp. 19-50.

    (2) Richard Sorabji, "Gregory of Nyssa: The Origins of Idealism," in Time, Creation and Continuum. Theories in Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages (London: Duckworth, 1983), pp. 287-96; Werner Beierwaltes, Denken des Einen. Studien zur neuplatonischen Philosophie and ihrer Wirkungsgeschichte (Frankfurt: Klostermann, 1985). See also Beierwaltes, "Die Wiederentdeckung des Eriugena im Deutschen Idealismus," in Platonismus und Idealismus (Frankfurt: Klostermann, 1972), pp. 188-201, and his "Zur Wirkungsgeschichte Eriugenas im Deutschen Idealismus und danach. Eine kurze, unsystematische Nachlese," in Eriugena. Grundzüge seines Denkens (Frankfurt: Klostermann, 1994), pp. 313-330. Eyjólfur Kjalar Emilsson, "Cognition and its Object," in Lloyd P. Gerson, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Plotinus (Cambridge: Cambridge U.P., 1996), pp. 217-49, esp. pp. 245-49. But see, Lloyd P. Gerson, Plotinus (London: Routledge, 1994), p. 227, n. 3, who maintains that Plotinus is not an idealist.

    (3) Dermot Moran, The Philosophy of John Scottus Eriugena. A Study of Idealism in the Middle Ages (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989).

  77. ———. 2002. "Time and Eternity in the Periphyseon." In History and Eschatology in John Scottus Eriugena and His Time, edited by McEvoy, James and Dunne, Michael, 487-508. Leuven: Leuven University Press.

  78. ———. 2004. "An Original Christian Platonism: Eriugena's Response to the Tradition." In Bilan Et Perspectives Des Études Médiévales (1993-1998). Euroconférence Barcelone, 8-12 Juin 1999. Actes Du Iie Congrès Européen D'études Médiévales, edited by Hamesse, Jacqueline, 467-487. Turnhout: Brepols.

  79. ———. 2006. "Spiritualis Incrassatio: Eriugena's Intellectualist Immaterialism: Is It an Idealism?" In Eriugena, Berkeley and the Idealist Tradition, edited by Gersh, Stephen and Moran, Dermot, 123-150. Notre Dame: Indiana University Press.

  80. ———. 2013. "Jean Scot Érigène, La Connaissance De Soi Et La Tradition Idéaliste." Les Études philosophiques:29-56.

    "In this essay, I explore Eriugena’s idealism in his own terms, attempting to capture the specific nature of his theological, metaphysical and epistemological application of the relation between non being and being. I suggest that the German Idealists are justified in embracing Eriugena for his recognition of the universe as a product of the process of self-articulation and self-understanding of the divine mind. Eriugena’s account of the nature of all existence as essentially immaterial, his ontological ranking of the apparently physical, material, and sensible world below the level of mind and, in a specific sense, dependent on mind, and his understanding of all things as contained in the divine mind (and by extension in the human mind as imago dei), must be evaluated not only as constituting an original philosophical system in its own right, but also as a dynamic and intellectualist idealism. Eriugena’s infinite nature involves the dialectical interplay of hiddenness and manifestation, nothingness and being, mind unknown to itself coming to self-knowledge in an infinite knowing and unknowing."

  81. Nuchelmans, Jan. 1991. "Hilduin Et Jean Scot Erigène, Traducteurs Du Pseudo-Denys, Devant L'infinitif Substantivé Grec." In Eulogia. Mélanges Offerta À Antoon A. R. Bastiaensen À L'occasion De Son Soixante-Cinquième Anniversaire, edited by Bartelink, Gerard J.M., Hilhorst, A. and Kneepkens, Corneille H., 201-232. Den Haag: Martinus Nijhoff.

  82. O'Meara, Dominic. 1977. "L'investigation Et Les Investigateurs Dan La De Divisione Naturae." In Jean Scot Érigène Et L'histoire De La Philosophie, edited by Roques, René, 225-234. Paris: Éditions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique.

    Reprinted as Essay XX in: D. O'Meara, The structure of Being and the Search for the Good. Essays on Ancient and Early Medieval Platonism, Aldershot, Ashgate, 1998.

  83. ———. 1981. "The Concept of Natura in John Scottus Eriugena (De Diuisione Naturae Book I)." Vivarium no. 19:126-145.

    Reprinted as Essay XXI in: D. O'Meara, The structure of Being and the Search for the Good. Essays on Ancient and Early Medieval Platonism, Aldershot, Ashgate, 1998.

    "In this article I shall attempt (I) to isolate as far as possible what Eriugena means by his concept of natura, by reviewing both the sources he was inspired by and his use of these sources in the elaboration of this concept. I shall then seek (II) to determine the bearing of this concept on the general inquiry conducted in the De divisione naturae by examining its relationship to conceptions presented immediately after it, i.e. the well-known fourfold division of nature and the fivefold classification of modes of being and non-being. Finally (III), the philosophical implications of Eriugena's conception of a study of natura (physiologia) will be discussed briefly insofar as this study is suggestive of an unusual metaphysical project."

  84. ———. 1990. "The Metaphysical Use of Mathematical Concepts in Eriugena." In Begriff Und Metapher. Sprachform Des Denkens Bei Eriugena, edited by Beierwaltes, Werner, 142-148. Heidelberg: Carl Winter.

    Reprinted as Essay XXIII in: D. O'Meara, The structure of Being and the Search for the Good. Essays on Ancient and Early Medieval Platonism, Aldershot, Ashgate, 1998.

  85. ———. 1998. The Structure of Being and the Search for the Good. Essays on Ancient and Early Medieval Platonism. Aldershot: Ashgate Variorum.

    Essays on Eriugena: XX. L'Investigation et les investigateurs dans le De divisione naturae de Jean Scot Erigene; XXI. The Concept of Natura in John Scottus Eriugena (De divisione naturae Book I); XXII. The Problem of Speaking about God in John Scottus Eriugena; XXIII. The Metaphysical Use of Mathematical Concepts in Eriugena; XXIV. Eriugena and Aquinas on the Beatific Vision.

  86. O'Meara, John Joseph. 1977. "Eriugena's Use of Augustine in His Teaching of the Return of the Soul and the Vision of God." In Jean Scot Erigène Et L'histoire De La Philosophie, edited by Roques, René, 191-200. Paris: Éditions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique.

  87. ———. 1980. ""Magnorum Virorum Quendam Consensum Velimus Machinari' (804 B): Eriugena's Use of Augustine's De Genesi Ad Litteram in the Periphyseon." In Eriugena. Studien Zu Seinen Quellen, edited by Beierwaltes, Werner, 105-116. Heidelberg: Carl Winter.

  88. ———. 1983. "The Problem of Speaking About God in John Scottus Eriugena." In Carolingian Essays. Andrew W. Mellon Lectures in Early Christian Studies, edited by Blumenthal, Ute-Renate, 151-167. Washington: Catholic University of America Press.

    Reprinted as Essay XXII in: D. O'Meara, The structure of Being and the Search for the Good. Essays on Ancient and Early Medieval Platonism, Aldershot, Ashgate, 1998.

  89. ———. 1986. "Translating Eriugena." In Jean Scot Écrivain, edited by Allard, Guy-H., 115-128. Paris: Vrin.

  90. ———. 1987. "Eriugena's Immediate Influence." In Eriugena Redivivus. Zur Wirkungeschichte Seines Denkens Im Mittelalter Und Im Übergang Zur Neuzeit, edited by Beierwaltes, Werner, 13-25. Heidelberg: Carl Winter.

  91. ———. 1987. "Eriugena and Aquinas on the Beatific Vision." In Eriugena Redivivus. Zur Wirkungeschichte Seines Denkens Im Mittelalter Und Im Übergang Zur Neuzeit, edited by Beierwaltes, Werner, 224-236. Heidelberg: Carl Winter.

    Reprinted as Essay XXIV in: D. O'Meara, The structure of Being and the Search for the Good. Essays on Ancient and Early Medieval Platonism, Aldershot, Ashgate, 1998.

  92. ———. 1988. Eriugena. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

  93. ———. 1992. "Contrasting Approaches to Neoplatonic Immaterialism: Augustine and Eriugena." In From Athens to Chartres. Neoplatonism and Medieval Thought. Studies in Honour of Edouard Jeauneau, edited by Westra, Haijo Jan, 175-180. Leiden: Brill.

  94. ———. 2011. Studies in Augustine and Eriugena.

    Edited by Thomas Halton.

    Section IV. Augustine and Eriugena. 17. Augustine's Understanding of the Creation and Fall 233; 18. Eriugena's Use of Augustine in His Teaching on the Return of the Soul and the Vision of God 244; 19. Eriugena's Use of Augustine in His Teaching on the Soul-Body Relationship 255; 20. Eriugena's Use of Augustine's De Genesi ad litteram in the Periphyseon 269-285.

  95. Otten, Willemien. 1973. "The Role of Man in the Eriugenian Universe: Dependance or Autonomy." In Giovanni Scoto Nel Suo Tempo. L'organizzazione Del Sapere in Età Carolingia, edited by Leonardi, Claudio, 595-609. Spoleto: Centro italiano di studi sull'alto medioevo.

  96. ———. 1977. "The Influence of Eriugenian Thought: Report on the International Eriugena Colloquium, Bad Homburg, 26-30 August 1985." Studi Medievali no. 18:461-473.

    Brief summaries of the papers presented at the colloquium.

  97. ———. 1990. "The Universe of Nature and the Universe of Man: Difference and Identity." In Begriff Und Metapher. Sprachform Des Denkens Bei Eriugena, edited by Beierwaltes, Werner, 202-212. Heidelberg: Carl Winter.

  98. ———. 1990. "The Interplay of Nature and Man in the Periphyseon." Vivarium no. 28:1-16.

  99. ———. 1991. The Anthropology of Johannes Scottus Eriugena. Leiden: Brill.

  100. ———. 1991. "Eriugena's Dialectic of the Return." Harvard Theological Review no. 84:399-421.

  101. ———. 1992. "Between Damnation and Restoration. The Dynamics of Human Nature in Eriugens's Perphyseon and Alan of Lille's Anticlaudianus." In From Athens to Chartres. Neoplatonism and Medieval Thought. Studies in Honour of Edouard Jeauneau, edited by Westra, Haijo Jan, 329-350. Leiden: Brill.

  102. ———. 1993. "Eriugena's 'Periphyseon' and the Concept of Eastern Versus Western Patristic Influence." In Studia Patristica. Vol. 28: Xv. Nachleben of the Fathers, edited by Livingstone, Elizabeth A., 217-224. Leuven: Peeters Press.

  103. ———. 1994. "Eriugena's Periphyseon: A Carolingian Contribution to the Theological Tradition." In Eriugena East and West, edited by McGinn, Bernard and Otten, Willemien, 69-94. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press.

  104. ———. 1999. "In the Shadow of the Divine: Negative Theology and Negative Anthropology in Augustine, Pseudo-Dionysius and Eriugena." Heytrop Journal no. 40.

    "To analyze the tradition of negative theology, the article goes back to its prime architect, Pseudo-Dionysius. By comparing him to an author who preceded him, viz. Augustine, and one who followed him, viz. Eriugena, the article aims at giving a 'thicker' description of his position by framing it historically. In doing so it draws two conclusions. It first shows that the connection between negative theology and negative anthropology is indeed Dionysian; as such it is rightfully pointed to in postmodern thought. In contradistinction to postmodern applications, however, Dionysius' interest in negativity is shown to reflect before all a desire to wrestle with the overpowering presence of the divine instead of concluding to its absence."

  105. ———. 2002. "Realized Eschatology of Philosophical Idealism: The Case of Eriugena's Periphyseon." In Ende Und Vollendung. Eschatologische Perspektiven Im Mittelalter, edited by Aertsen, Jan A. and Pickavé, Martin, 373-387. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.

  106. ———. 2006. "Anthropology between Imago Mundi and Imago Dei: The Place of Johannes Scottus Eriugena in the Tradition of Christian Thought." In Studia Patristica.Vol.43: Augustine, Other Latin Writers, edited by Young, Frances, Edwards, Michael and Parvis, Paul M., 459-472. Leuven: Peeters.

  107. Paparella, Francesco. 2009. Le Teorie Neoplatoniche Del Simbolo. Il Caso Di Giovanni Eriugena. Milano: Vita e Pensiero.

  108. Perger, Mischa von. 2005. "Eriugenas Adaption Der Aristotelischen Kategorienlehre." In Logik Und Theologie. Das Organon Im Arabischen Und Im Lateinischen Mittelalter, edited by Perler, Dominik and Rudolph, Ulrich, 239-304. Leiden: Brill.

  109. Petroff, Valery V. 2002. "Theoriae of the Return in John Scottus' Escahtology." In History and Eschatology in John Scottus Eriugena and His Time, edited by McEvoy, James and Dunne, Michael, 527-580. Leuven: Leuven University Press.

  110. Piemonte, Gustavo. 1968. "Notas Sobre La Creatio De Nihilo En Juan Escoto Eriúgena." Sapientia no. 23:37-58; 115-132.

  111. ———. 1986. "L'expression "Quae Sunt Et Quae Non Sunt": Jean Scot Et Marius Victorinus." In Jean Scot Écrivain, edited by Allard, Guy-H., 81-113. Paris: Vrin.

    "L'expression double «quae sunt et quae non sunt», dont les membres antithétiques veulent embrasser la totalité du réel, revient souvent, comme on sait, dans les écrits de Jean Scot. Elle est présente, tout d'abord, dans le Periphyseon, et dès ses premières pages, consacrées à l'explication bien connue des manières d'entendre la distinction entre les «choses qui sont» et les «choses qui ne sont pas». Mais elle paraît aussi dans les autres ouvrages érigéniens ; on la trouve déjà — avec une signification qui ne coïncide qu'en partie avec celle que lui donneront les textes postérieurs — dans le De divina praedestinatione; on la rencontre également dans les Expositiones in ierarchiam coelestem et dans le Commentaire sur l'évangile de Jean, et même dans des pièces d'un genre littéraire très différent, moins techniques et destinées à un public plus large, comme l'Homélie sur le prologue de ce même évangile, ou les poèmes. C'est justement la première occurrence de cette expression dans la Vox spiritualis, au chapitre I, lignes 6 et 8-12, avec les problèmes textuels qu'elle a soulevés, qui m'a amené à l'étudier dans l'ensemble de l'oeuvre de Jean Scot, et à me poser la question des origines possibles d'une locution si typiquement érigénienne. Elle n'était probablement pas courante au temps de notre auteur, puisqu'il se donne plusieurs fois la peine de l'expliquer à ses lecteurs. Où Jean Scot avait-il trouvé l'inspiration pour cette formule d'apparence paradoxale, qui occupait souvent ses méditations et sur laquelle il exerçait toutes les forces de son intelligence («saepe mihi cogitanti diligentiusque quantum uires suppetunt inquirenti... ») ? Chez Denys et Maxime le Confesseur, oui, sans doute; l'Érigène le dit lui-même (4), et d'ailleurs il n'est pas difficile de retrouver, derrière les mots latins, les vocables grecs respectifs (tà ônta, tà me ônta) ; il s'agit bien d'un cas de traduction, et cela n'a rien d'extraordinaire. Mais on peut toujours se demander si notre auteur n'aurait pas suivi consciemment l'exemple de quelque prédécesseur dans son adaptation au latin de ces éléments de la terminologie philosophique grecque. Après avoir fait quelques recherches personnelles, je crois que l'opinion qu'expriment à cet égard, un peu en passant, certains historiens est juste, et que la réponse à la question posée doit être affirmative. Il me semble par ailleurs que l'influence du prédécesseur en question — je parle de Marius Victorinus — n'est pas limitée à ce seul point: elle s'étend aussi à d'autres thèmes, et la façon dont l'Érigène l'a assimilée pourrait nous dire quelque chose sur ses procédés de composition littéraire et en même temps éclaircir certains aspects de sa pensée. (pp. 81-83)

    (4). Cf. Homéelie sur le prologue de Jean (1969), p. 204, n. 1.

  112. ———. 1986. ""Vita in Omnia Pervenit". El Vitalismo Eriugeniano Y La Influencia De Mario Victorino." Patristica et Mediaevalia no. 7:3-48.

  113. ———. 1987. "Les Expositiones in Ierarchiam Coelestem De Jean Scot Et Un Opuscule Hébreu Pseudépigraphique Du Xiiie Siècle." In Eriugena Redivivus. Zur Wirkungsgeschichte Seines Denkens Im Mittelalter Und Im Übergang Zur Neuzeit, edited by Beierwaltes, Werner, 279-310. Heidelberg: Carl Winter.

  114. ———. 1990. "Image Et Contenu Intelligible Dans La Conception Érigénienne De La 'Diffusio Dei'." In Begriff Und Metapher. Sprachform Des Denkens Bei Eriugena, edited by Beierwaltes, Werner, 80-94. Heidelberg: Carl Winter.

  115. ———. 1992. "'Ioannes Scotus Vel Chrysostomus'. Acerca De La Atribución De Obras Eriugenianas a Juan Crisóstomo." Stylos no. 1:37-58.

  116. ———. 1996. "Recherches Sur Les "Tractatus in Matheum" Attribués À Jean Scot." In Iohannes Scottus Eriugena. The Bible and Hermeneutics, edited by Riel, Gerd van, Steel, Carlos and McEvoy, James. Leuven: Leuven University Press.

  117. ———. 2002. "Some Distinctive Theses of Eriugena's Eschatology in His Exegesis of the Gospel According to St. Matthew." In History and Eschatology in John Scottus Eriugena and His Time, edited by McEvoy, James and Dunne, Michael, 227-242. Leuven: Leuven University Press.

  118. Pinzani, Roberto. 2012. "Alle Origini Del Realismo. Appunti Sull’ontologia Di Scoto Eriugena." Documenti e Studi sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale no. 23:107-142.

    "I would like to discuss in this article some issues concerning Scotus Eriugena’s ontology. I will focus on the De Divisione naturae and, in particular, on the concepts of ‘nature’, ‘essence/substance’, ‘matter’, ‘form’, ‘species’ and ‘genus’. I will also pay attention to the way in which

    Scotus deals with some traditional logic themes, like that of individuation and universals. The underlying assumption is that (realist) philosophers of the ‘twelfth Century renaissance’ take into some consideration elements of Scotus’ ontology when discussing the problem of universals.

    I tried to read Scotus language in a ‘neutral’ way, by translating it literally, disregarding historical metaphysical interpretations (which are considered anyway in the footnotes), and by rendering metaphors and literary texts in a comprehensible way, as far as possible."

  119. Préaux, Jean. 1977. "Jean Scot Et Martin De Laon En Face Du De Nuptiis De Martianus Capella." In Jean Scot Erigène Et L'histoire De La Philosophie, edited by Roques, René, 161-170. Paris: Éditions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique.

  120. Puxley, David. "The Role of the Human in the Procession and Return of the Cosmos from Plotinus to Eriugena." Dionysius no. 24:175-208.

    "The first two parts of this study examine the formulations of Plotinus and Porphyry (Part 1) and of Iamblichus and Proclus (Part 2) with respect to the median and mediating nature of the human self in terms of its capacity for anagogé and énosis. Part 3 examines the early reception and transformation of the Iamblicho-Procline formulation. In Part 4 we see that in the «Periphyseon» of Eriugena an early and profound synthesis is to be found, with the result that in Eriugena the human soul or self is the agent of creation and thus central to the «exitus» and «reditus» of the cosmos."

  121. Ramelli, Ilaria. 2012. "Eriugena's Commentary on Martianus in the Framework of His Thought and the Philosophical Debate of His Time." In Carolingian Scholarship and Martianus Capella. Ninth-Century Commentary Traditions on 'De Nuptiis' in Context, edited by O'Sullivan, Sinead and Teeuwen, Mariken, 245-272. Turnhout: Brepols.

  122. ———. 2013. The Christian Doctrine of Apokatastasis: A Critical Assessment from the New Testament to Eriugena. Leiden: Brill.

    On Eriugena see in particular: Shift to the West but on Geek Patristic Grounds: John the Scot Eriugena and Apokatastasis as Reditus, pp. 773-815.

  123. Rand, Edward Kennard. 1920. "The Supposed Autographa of John the Scot." University of California Publications in Classical Philology no. 5:135-141.

  124. ———. 1940. "How Much of the Annotationes in Marcianum Is the Work of John the Scot?" Transactions and Proceedings of the American Philological Association no. 71:501-523.

  125. Roques, René. 1973. "Traduction Ou Interprétation? Brèves Remarques Sur Jean Scot Traducteur De Denis." In The Mind of Eriugena, edited by O'Meara, John Joseph and Bieler, Ludwig, 59-75. Dublin: Irish University Press.

  126. ———. 1975. Libres Sentiers Vers L'érigénisme. Roma: Edizioni dell'Ateneo.

  127. Rorem, Paul. 2008. "The Early Latin Dyonisius: Eriugena and Hugh of St. Victor." Modern Theology no. 24:601-614.

    "This essay sketches how Eriugena and Hugh of St. Victor interpreted the Areopagite, emphasizing key passages for each. Eriugena's translation of the Corpus Dyonisianum and his Expositiones on The Celestial Hierarchy exerted a tremendous influence on subsequent Latin readers, including Hugh, and even survived the condemnation of his masterwork, the Periphyseon. The Victorine, whose own Augustinian inclinations were largely untouched by his encounter with the Areopagite, nevertheless exerted a distinctive influence by (falsely) attributing to Dionysius the view that in our pursuit of God, "love surpasses knowledge." Together, despite their stark differences, they bequeathed a lively Dionysian tradition to the high medieval authors, scholastics and mystics alike."

  128. Rosemann, Philipp W. 1996. Omne Agens Agit Sibi Simile. A "Repetition" of Scholastic Metaphysics. Leuven: Leuven University Press.

    "Chapter IV, "Eriugena -- Causality as Concealing Revelation" follows the great Irish philosopher in his reflections upon causality as a manifestation of the cause in and through its effect, a manifestation, however, which by its very nature cannot but conceal the cause at the same time as it discloses it. For the Christian thinker that is Eriugena, the Trinity constitutes the paradigm of this "concealing revelation". God, who is beyond being and, therefore, strictly speaking "no-thing", enters the domain of being -- "creates himself", as Eriugena puts it in daring terms -- in and through the Trinity, and then, derivatively, through the natural world. We can know God -- and, indeed, God can only come to "know" himself -- only through his effects; yet as in these effects God "alienates" himself from his "true" nature, which is "nothing", creation is as much an obstacle as an aid in our quest for God. Moreover, this ambiguity is not only a theoretical one, having as it does repercussions upon the moral quality of creation, which, as "revelation", serves as a signpost on the road to God, while as "concealment" it presents dangerous temptations, and the occasion of sin." p. 27.

  129. Rudnick, Ulrich. 1990. Das System Des Johannes Scottus Eriugena. Eine Theologisch-Philosophische Studie Zu Seinem Werk. Bern: Peter Lang.

  130. Russell, Robert. 1973. "Some Augustinian Influences in Eriugena's De Diuisione Naturae." In The Mind of Eriugena, edited by O'Meara, John Joseph and Bieler, Ludwig, 31-40. Dublin: Irish University Press.

  131. Schrimpf, Gangolf. 1973. "Zur Frage Der Authentizität Unserer Texte Von Johannes Scottus' 'Annotationes in Marcianum'." In The Mind of Eriugena, edited by O'Meara, John Joseph and Bieler, Ludwig, 125-137. Dublin: Irish University Press.

  132. ———. 1977. "Wertung Und Rezeption Antker Logik Im Karolingerreich." In Logik, Ethik, Theorie Der Geisteswissenschaften., edited by Patzig, Günther, Scheibe, Erhard and Wieland, Wolfgang, 451-456. Hamburg: Meiner.

    XI. Deutscher Kongress für Philosophie, Göttingen, 5 - 9 Oktober 1975.

    "In the years preceding the mid-9th-century Predestination controversy, the doctrine of the Church was defended, and taught, by means of the catena, that is by a survey of the teaching of the Fathers of the Church. In the middle of the 9th century a new method was resorted to by Eriugena, viz. the use of Logic. The author seeks to identify JSE's probable sources in ancient and late antique literature: these he lists, together with the provenance of the manuscripts to which JSE could have had access. He discerns three crucial stages in the dissemination of the relevant literature, viz. Charlemagne's circle and in particular Alcuin, the monastery of Fulda under Rhabanus Maurus, and the cathedral school at Laon in the period of Martinus Scottus and JSE - about 840-860. At the first stage Logic remained a theoretical school subject: at Fulda syllogistic argument began to be appreciated; in Eriugena's writings it became part of the very fabric, reflecting the inherent negative and positive aspects that he sought to express. This bries article is enriched by two valuable pages of footnotes." (B.)

  133. ———. 1982. Das Werk Des Johannes Scottus Eriugena Im Rahmen Des Wissenschaftsverständnisses Seiner Zeit. Eine Hinführung Zu Periphyseon. Münster: Aschendorff.

  134. ———. 1989. "Die Systematische Bedeutung Der Beiden Logischen Einteilungen (Divisiones) Zu Beginn Von Periphyseon." In Giovanni Scoto Nel Suo Tempo. L'organizzazione Del Sapere in Età Carolingia, 113-151. Spoleto: Centro Italiano di Studi dull'Alto Medieoevo.

  135. ———. 1990. "Der Begriff Des Elements in Periphyseon Iii." In Begriff Und Metapher. Sprachform Des Denkens Bei Eriugena, edited by Beierwaltes, Werner, 65-79. Heidelberg: Carl Winter.

  136. ———. 1992. "Vita - Anima - Corpus Spirituale. Ein Vorschlag Zur Interpretation Von Periphyseon Iii Cap. 36-39 Und V Col. 978b-994b." In From Athens to Chartres. Neoplatonism and Medieval Thought. Studies in Honour of Edouard Jeauneau, edited by Westra, Haijo Jan, 195-221. Leiden: Brill.

  137. ———. 2007. "Eine Wissenschaftstheoretische Anwendung Der "Dialectica" Bei Johannes Scottus Eriugena." In Dialektik Und Rhetorik Im Früheren Und Hohen Mittelalter. Rezeption, Überlieferung Und Gesellschaftliche Wirkung Antiker Gelehrsamkeit Vornehmlich Im 9. Und 12. Jahrhundert, edited by Fried, Johannes, 51-72. München: R. Oldenbourg.

  138. Sheldon-Williams, Inglis Patrick. 1961. "The Title of Eriugena's Periphyseon." Studia Patristica no. 3:297-302.

    Papers presented to the Third International Conference on Patristic Studies held at Christ Church, Oxford, 1959.

    Texte und Untersuchungen zur Geschichte der altchristlichen Literatur, 78,

  139. ———. 1967. "The Greek Christian Platonist Tradition from the Cappadocians to Maximus and Eriugena." In The Cambridge History of Later Greek and Early Medieval Philosophy, edited by Armstrong, Arthur Hilary, 425-536. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

  140. ———. 1973. "Eriugena's Greek Sources." In The Mind of Eriugena, edited by O'Meara, John Joseph and Bieler, Ludwig, 1-15. Dublin: Irish University Press.

  141. Silvestre, Hubert. 1952. "Le Commentaire Inédit De Jean Scot Érigène Au Mètre Ix Du Livre Iii Du De Consolatione Philosophiae De Boèce." Revue d'Histoire Ecclésiastique no. 47:44-122.

  142. ———. 1956. "Le Commentaire Sur Prudence Du Paris. Lat. 13953 Et Du Pal. Lat. 235 Est À Attribuer À Scot Érigène." Scriptorium no. 10:90-92.

  143. Smith, Lesley. 1989. "The Manscript Tradition of Periphyseon Book 4." In Giovanni Scoto Nel Suo Tempo. L'organizzazione Del Sapere in Età Carolingia, edited by Leonardi, Claudio, 499-512. Spoleto: Centro italiano di studi sull'Alto Medioevo.

  144. ———. 1992. "Yet More on the Autograph of John the Scot: Ms Bamberg Ph. 2/2 and Its Place in Periphyseon Tradition." In From Athens to Chartres. Neoplatonism and Medieval Thought. Studies in Honour of Edouard Jeauneau, edited by Westra, Haijo Jan, 47-70. Leiden: Brill.

  145. Stock, Brian. 1967. "The Philosophical Anthropology of Johannes Scottus Eriugena." Studi Medievali no. 8:1-57.

  146. ———. 1967. "Observations on the Use of Augustine by Johannes Scottus Eriugena." Harvard Theological Review no. 60:213-220.

    "The ninth-century metaphysician, John the Scot, who came very probably from Ireland to write both polemics and philosophy at the court of Charles the Bald, is known to have read a number of Augustine's writings, and to have cited them in his major work, De Divisione Naturae or Periphyseon,(1) at times without showing much regard for the context of his quotations. He composed Periphyseon around 86o A.D., (2) in a period which was noted for the dissemination of traditional theological ideas to a large, poorly educated public, rather than for its innovations.(3) The influence of Greek ideas on John's mind, unusual in his day, but not quite so unusual as we used to believe, (4) gradually gave rise to the position, now commonly held by historians, that his thought was more or less dominated by Greek ideas to the exclusion of the Latins. This position has had to be modified, however, in the light of closer examination of his use of figures like the

    Pseudo-Dionysius."

    (1) A list of citations from Augustine in Periphyseon and other works is compiled by Dom M. Cappuyns, Jean Scot Erigène: sa vie, son oeuvre, sa pensée (Brussels, 1964 [reprint]), 388f.

    (2) I. P. Sheldon-Williams, A Bibliography of Johannes Scottus Eriugena, Journal of Ecclesiastical History X' (1959), 198f.

    (3) B. Smalley, The Study of the Bible in the Middle Ages (Oxford, 1952), 371.

    (4) On the use of Greek in the theological literature of the period, see A. Siegemund, Die Überlieferung der griechischen christlichen Literatur in der lateinischen Kirche bis zum XII. Jahrhundert (Munich, 1949), and the occasional remarks of B. Bischoff in Wendepunkte in der Geschichte der lateinischen Exegese in] Frühmittelalter, Sacris Erudiri VI (1954), 189-281; on Eriugena's study of Greek, Cappuyns, op. cit., 128-46.

  147. ———. 1977. ""Intelligo Me Esse": Eriugena's "Cogito"." In Jean Scot Erigène Et L'histoire De La Philosophie, edited by Roques, René, 327-336. Paris: Éditions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique.

  148. ———. 1980. "In Search of Eriugena's Augustine." In Eriugena. Studien Zu Seinen Quellen, edited by Beierwaltes, Werner, 85-104. Heidelberg: Carl Winter.

  149. Théry, Gabriel. 1931. "Scot Erigène Traducteur De Denys." Archives d'Histoire Doctrinale et Littéraire du Moyen-Age:185-278.

    "Pour sa traduction des écrits du Pseudo-Denys, Scot Erigène dispose déjà de la version d'Hilduin. D'ailleurs il y a tout lieu de croire que, dès 851, il compte parmi les hellénistes de son temps. Importance du vocabulaire de la version de Scot Erigène pour la connaissance du langage philosophique et théologique qui se crée en Occident au IX siècle. Les idées nouvelles introduites par Denys vont déterminer une langue nouvelle."

  150. ———. 1933. "Scot Erigène Introducteur De Denys." New Scholasticism no. 7:91-108.

  151. Touchette, Gilles. 1986. "L'affixation Dans Le "Periphyseon". Analyse Générale Et Èétude D'un Cas Type." In Jean Scot Écrivain, edited by Allard, Guy-H., 327-341. Paris: Vrin.

  152. Traube, Ludwig. 1912. Autographa Des Iohannes Scottus. Aus Dem Nachlass Hrsg. Von Edward Kennard Rand. Mit 12 Tafeln. Vorgelegt Am 13. Januar, 1912. München: Verlag der Königlich Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften.

    Extracted from Palaeographische Forschungen, V.

  153. Trego, Kristell. 2008. "La Subsistence Des Existants. La Contribution De Jean Scot Erigène À La Constitution D'un Vocabulaire Latin De L'être." Chora: Revue d'études anciennes et médiévales no. 6:143-180.

    "S'il reprend des thèmes chers à la patristique, Erigène adapte ces notions théologiques afin de penser non plus tant l'être divin, que l'être créé, en sa condition même de créature. Ainsi Erigène reconnaît-il aux êtres créés, qu'il nomme «existants» (existentia), une subsistence qui, si elle se fonde dans l'essence divine, s'en distingue toutefois.

    Quoi qu'il en soit du contexte néoplatonicien dans lequel intervient le terme subsistence (utilisé notamment pour traduire l'huparxis du Pseudo-Denys ou de Maxime le Confesseur), l'on ne saurait le réduire à la nomination de la venue à l'être (c'est l'existence qui évoque cette idée). Réinvestissant la notion de subsistence qui s'est construite chez ses prédécesseurs latins, notre auteur s'en sert pour faire signe vers l'idée d'une permanence de ce qui est au-delà de la procession qui lui a permis d'accéder à l'être."

  154. Trouillard, Jean. 1973. "Érigène Et La Théophanie Créatrice." In The Mind of Eriugena, edited by O'Meara, John Joseph and Bieler, Ludwig, 98-113. Dublin: Irish University Press.

  155. ———. 1977. "La Notion D' "Analyse" Chez Érigène." In Jean Scot Erigène Et L'histoire De La Philosophie, edited by Roques, René, 349-356. Paris: Éditions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique.

  156. ———. 1983. "Erigène Et La Naissance Du Sens." In Platonismus Und Christentum. Festschrift Für Heinrich Dörrie, edited by Blume, Horst-Dieter and Mann, Friedhelm, 267-276. Münster: Aschendoff.

    "L'Auteur part de la distinction entre "Dieu" et la Déité chez Eckhart ("Dieu" nous cache la Déité), et montre que l'origine s'en trouve chez Erigène. Il présente ainsi le problème du "sens", c'est-à-dire de l'émergence de "Dieu", à partir du "non-sens originel" de la Déité, chez l'Erigène reconstruisant sa théorie des théophanies, sa théorie de la lumière et du néant, sa doctrine des mouvements de l'âme. Il conclut en inscrivant J. Scot dans le courant général du néoplatonisme. L'incarnation du verbe est le point d'articulation du non-sens originel avec le déploiement de la nature."

  157. Vernet, André. 1977. "Fragment D'un Manuscrit Du "Periphyseon" De Jean Scot (Xie Siècle)." In Jean Scot Erigène Et L'histoire De La Philosophie, edited by Roques, René, 101-108. Paris: Éditions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique.

  158. Vezin, Jean. 1977. "A Propos Des Manuscrits De Jean Scot: Quelques Remarques Sur Les Manuscrits Autographes Du Haut Moyen Åge." In Jean Scot Erigène Et L'histoire De La Philosophie, edited by Roques, René, 95-100. Paris: Éditions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique.

  159. Weiner, Sebastian Florian. 2007. Eriugenas Negative Ontologie. Amsterdam: B. R. Grüner.

    "Recently, there has been an upsurge of interest in the work Periphyseon of the early medieval philosopher John Scot Eriugena. Previous research has classified the book either as a piece of Neoplatonic philosophy or as part of the Latin dialectic tradition, which has led to one-sided interpretations. The present publication focuses instead on the philosophical claims defended in the Periphyseon itself, examines its originality and discusses the soundness of its argumentation. As a result, a hitherto unnoticed basic thought of the work has been uncovered, namely the concept of a negative ontology, according to which all substance is completely incomprehensible. This notion constitutes the greatest innovation of Eriugena's thought. In keeping with his negative ontology, Eriugena downgrades the fourfold division of nature that he had presented at the beginning of his work. A critical survey of the current readings of Eriugena as a Neoplatonist and idealist completes this book."

  160. ———. 2008. "Eriugena's Innovation." Vivarium no. 46:1-23.

    "John Scot Eriugena's work Periphyseon is commonly regarded as having introduced Neoplatonism into early medieval thinking. Eriugena's theory of the reunification of the Creator and his creation is then viewed as being based on the Neoplatonic scheme of procession and reversion. However, this interpretation falls short of Eriugena's intentions. Above all, he denies any ontological difference between Creator and creation without taking recourse to the Neoplatonic considerations of procession and reversion. Surprisingly, according to Eriugena's explanation, God is not only the Creator but he is also created. He is created insofar as he alone, possessing all being, is the essence of all created things. Moreover, the fourfold division of nature, presented at the beginning of the work, is not Eriugena's own innovation, but a common Carolingian concept. It is rather his aim to show that from an ontological point of view this division has to be resolved."

  161. Wilband, Marie Michelle. 2008. Ingenium Veterum Mirabile Laudet. Eriugena's Reception of the Aristotelian Categories and Their Role in the Periphyseon.

    Unpublished MA Thesis, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Available at ProQuest Dissertations & Theses.

    "Eriugena's discussion of the Aristotelian categories in Book One of the Periphyseon has the appearance of a mere digression in the context of the work as a whole. Moreover, it is often seen as an incoherent interpretation of Aristotle's original doctrine put forward in the Categories. This thesis proposes to correct these views by reading Eriugena's treatment of the categories in the context of the Neoplatonic commentary tradition, as well as in Eriugena's own historical context. Eriugena's interpretation of the categories becomes coherent when read as a Carolingian development of the Late Antique commentators, Iamblichus in particular. The fruit of that development, namely Eriugena's unusual approach to the categories as generative intellectual realities, makes his treatment of them integral to his system, and the appropriate starting point for the Periphyseon as a whole."

    Contents: Abstract VI; Acknowledgments VII; 1. Introduction 1; 2. Th Early Tradition of the Categories from Aristotle to Ammonius 6; 3. Eriugena's Direct Sources - The Categories from Augustine to Alcuin 29; 4. Eriugena's Reception and Treatment of the Categories 48; 5. Cnclusion 92; Bibliography 97-107.

  162. Wohlmann, Avital. 1983. "L'homme Et Le Sensible Dans La Pensée De Jean Scot Erigène." Revue Thomiste no. 83:243-273.

  163. ———. 1983. "L'ontologie Du Sensible Dans La Philosophie De Scot Erigène." Revue Thomiste no. 83:558-582.

  164. Zier, Mark A. 1989. "The Shape of the Critical Edition of Perhyseon Iv." In Giovanni Scoto Nel Suo Tempo. L'organizzazione Del Sapere in Età Carolingia, edited by Leonardi, Claudio, 487-498. Spoleto: Centro italiano di studi sull'Alto Medioevo.

  165. ———. 1992. "The Growth of an Idea." In From Athens to Chartres. Neoplatonism and Medieval Thought. Studies in Honour of Edouard Jeauneau, edited by Westra, Haijo Jan, 71-83. Leiden: Brill.

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